ARTIST STATEMENT

 

I was born and raised on Vancouver Island, on the breathtaking west coast of BC. In the hustle of growing up and navigating the complex and modern world in which we live, even in this quiet corner of the world, I have found myself on autopilot, not being fully present within the environment that surrounds me, my place within it or in what ways it has shaped my identity. This is where my art practice has become invaluable.

Wildlife / Environment

At the core of my practice is an exploration into the natural environment and our place within it – the habitat, the animals, and the vast number of people that surround us. Through my work I seek to understand and appreciate our connections within this living network. These connections can be developed through various sensations including memory, impression, perception, presence and absence, attraction and abjection, understanding and misunderstanding which I then translate onto the painting or drawing surface.

Human / Nature

An element to these connections is the human condition. How do people live, thrive and struggle in relation to one another and the natural world? My work considers personal relationships with family, friends, nature, animals, mundane objects, physical sensations, body and mind. Through these inquires I seek to understand how identities and connections are constructed.

Light / Colour / Memory / Connection

Light and colour are crucial components within my work, setting a tone for the subject and my emotional association with it. I express this most vividly through my aesthetic use of “orbs of light”, known in photography as “bokeh”, which introduces the subject with focused yet unfocused recollection. Memory is a key source of inspiration within my art practice, formed through happiness, tragedy, fear, spirituality, pain, excitement and other physical and emotional experiences. It is unknown if memories entirely exist, or if they are perceived into being. Memories may be easily recalled, or reveal themselves through disparate fragmentation. They can also evolve over time through repetition of thought or story-telling. They may be consciously considered, or exist subconsciously on the edge of our periphery. Recalling our interactions with people, nature, objects, and moments creates a complex network of thought that is the foundation of our identities.